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Archive for the ‘religion’ Category

I guess I haven’t been around much on account of spending all my time with the L.A. Gnostic Group.

Come join me if you like and check it out…

“An afternoon of talks, meditation, light refreshments, and a special preview of Secret Quest.”

Sounds good to me!

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ffs2edfrontcover-sm1This is one of my favorite books of all time; Flight of the Feathered Serpent by Armando Cosani.

It is a fascinating book, which portrays Judas Iscariot – the ‘traitor’ who gave Jesus away – in a very different light to that which history has led us to believe. It also contains a profound spiritual message the reveals the secret potential within us all.

This is what is written on the back cover:

One of the great spiritual teachings of any age, imbued with a rare wisdom found only in the most revered of sacred texts, but what is its origin?

It begins with the true story of a journalist in the Second World War. His life changes inexplicably after he meets with a mysterious man, who leave him with a series of profound writings – one being a first-hand account of Judas’ life with Jesus and the events leading up to the betrayal.

The writings also contain extraordinary insights into the lives of Judas, Jesus and the Disciples which astonishingly seem to correlate with the recently discovered Gospel of Judas.

Could these be the teachings of Judas Iscariot and his account of his relationship with Jesus? Could this be Judas’ attempt to clear his own name, in a miraculous effort to change the world’s perceptions and help humanity in its spiritual quest?

It seems I’m not the only one who loves this book – The Flight of the Feathered Serpent won 1st place in the category Religion: Christianity, in the USA Book News National “Best Books 2009” awards.

An award very much deserved!

I HIGHLY recommend this book to anyone who is yearning for spiritual truth, it truly is an amazing read.

 

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christ5Despite my family being non-religious and us never going to church, as a young child I had much love for God and Jesus. I didn’t intellectually analyze what or who God or Jesus were, they just were, I just felt felt love for them. I felt this love went both ways too. It was simple, and it was pure. I can’t remember who explained them to me, maybe it was Mum, or maybe it was religious instruction at primary school. But I remember the feeling.

One Easter when it was way past my bedtime, Dad fell asleep on the couch and in glee I stayed up to watch T.V. Being Easter there was a movie on about Jesus (it was probably Jesus of Nazareth, I’m not sure). Anyway what started off as glee turned to horror as I watched what we did to him and how he suffered on the cross – up until then I knew ‘he died for our sins’ but I had no clue we tortured and murdered him. I was absolutely mortified and traumatized by it, I felt so much shame for the human race and what we had done. I cried about it for days, and I remember Mum’s frustration at Dad for being “irresponsible” and letting me see that movie when I should have been in bed.

As I grew up though, I slowly lost that loving feeling, and the word ‘Christ’ began to represent something to almost be ashamed of. It certainly wasn’t ‘cool’ to be Christian put it that way. All the Christians I came across were a very peculiar type of people – they would preach about sin and heaven and hell, yet they themselves were some of the most judgmental, unforgiving people I had ever met. Often they were extremely fanatical about their faith, even aggressive about it, and the term “Christian” became tainted for me.

I began to question the Orthodox view of God and Christ, things just didn’t add up. How is it fair that these individuals who called themselves ‘Christian’, who were such horrible people underneath their preaching, go to heaven because they went to church on Sundays to be forgiven for their sins, when others of different faith would go to hell, no matter what they were like inside? They could be saints and the door would be shut to them. Where is the love in that? That just didn’t make sense! That wasn’t the God or Jesus I loved as a child, and eventually I turned my back on them, just as one dismisses Santa Clause when you discover he was never real in the first place.

But in recent years I have began to learn a different view of what ‘Christ’ actually is, different to what is portrayed in mainstream Orthodox Christianity. And the teachings of Jesus now make a whole lot more sense in this new context.

To truly live without sin is to eliminate it within, to fundamentally change. It is not enough to outwardly act a certain way if within you there is negativity, hatred, judgment, anger, frustration and so on. These negative aspects need to be removed so that the truly spiritual can manifest in their place.

Many people consider themselves ‘spiritual people’ and ‘good people’ or even ‘Christian’, however if they were to observe what is actually within themselves, they would be horrified by the harsh reality of who they really are. You can profess to love Christ all you like, but in those moments of negativity towards another human being (and we all have those moments) what is manifesting is far from spiritual.

By observing ourselves, we can see this harsh reality, and we can begin to change. With the help of the Divine, we can eliminate these negative aspects and increase our capacity for love, peace and to truly experience the Divine. But we cannot change what we cannot see.

The Christ is a Divine force that can live within. Jesus had this force within him and was teaching us how we could incarnate this force within ourselves, how we can change and become truly spiritual people. And what I am talking about goes far beyond simply going to church or ‘believing’ in God or Jesus.

“Now, since it has been said that you are my twin and true companion, examine yourself, and learn who you are, in what way you exist, and how you will come to be. Since you are called my brother, it is not fitting that you be ignorant of yourself … For he who has not known himself has known nothing, but he who has known himself has at the same time already achieved knowledge about the depth of the all.”

Jesus,

The Nag Hammadi Library

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